Frequently Asked Questions

Animal testing

  • Are KIKO products tested on animals?

    KIKO does not carry out or order testing on animals, pursuant to the relative European laws. For any further information, please visit our "No to animal testing."section

  • Why do KIKO products not carry the 'not tested on animals' indication and the 'cruelty free' leaping bunny symbol? Why is KIKO not listed among the cosmetics companies registered with the LAV (Italian anti-vivisection league)?

    The European Union has prohibited the testing of finished products on animals since the beginning of the 80s.

    Furthermore, since March 2009, the marketing of cosmetic products containing ingredients tested on animals outside the EU has been prohibited.

    The guidelines on the application of declarations relating to the absence of animal testing as contained in 2006/406/EC directive, indicate the following:

    "According to European legislation, the company which places the product on the market is not required to use a claim that indicates that no animal testing was carried out." The logo depicting the "Cruelty Free - Leaping Bunny," the use of which requires registration with certain private entities, is neither mandatory nor necessary for guaranteeing and attesting the compliance with existing laws.

    Actually, KIKO decided as its own specific policy on the matter, not to register with private entities and therefore not to pay the corresponding annual fees for registration and certification. So that the company's main focus is, in terms of resources and investments, on research and development of innovative products safe for human health, as well as not tested on animals. We'd also like to point out that KIKO, while developing new products, does not carry out safety tests on animals, but realizes all appropriate checks.

    For further information, please visit our "No to animal testing."section.

  • Do KIKO products contain ingredients of animal origin?

    By "ingredients of animal origin" we mean a raw material produced by the animal itself (for example, beeswax) or by external processes that do not rule out health and safety (for example: the wool shearing process).

    Our Research and Development Department always chooses the plant alternative. It goes without saying that even Beeswax, commonly contained in most lip products on the market, is an animal-origin compound, as are the bristles of some of our brushes (the hair is "shaved," as is done to obtain wool for clothing).

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